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Child Custody Archives

Jealousy and custody disputes

The emotional impact of the divorce process can be intense, and people may struggle with various negative feelings while they are bringing their marriage to an end (these emotions can also linger after the divorce process is complete). Aside from depression, or even anger, some people may have a difficult time with jealousy. For example, a parent may be jealous due to the amount of time that their child’s other parent will be able to spend with the child, or they may be upset because of some other facet of the custody process. These emotions can become especially strong when a difficult dispute occurs.

Can you relocate with your child during divorce?

You know that your marriage is coming to an end and that divorcing your spouse is inevitable. While you firmly believe that relocating to someplace else in Oregon is what is best for you and your children, you are unsure if your decision will be supported by other people including your family and friends. Ultimately, the courts will weigh in on your request and determine if your decision will be in the best interest of your children. 

Custody disputes and social media

Child custody disputes can be extremely emotional, and parents may face a number of challenges while working through these matters. From concerns about legal issues to anxiety over one’s ability to spend an ideal amount of time with kids, custody battles can bring on many difficulties. Furthermore, some parents may feel the need to share their feelings and experiences on social media. Moreover, parents may share unrelated information online which could also affect their custody dispute, and this is important to keep in mind if you are active on social media and going through a dispute over child custody.

Developing a visitation schedule that is fair and functional

When a couple in Oregon chooses to get divorced, their decision may require that one or both parents relocate as the courts negotiate the details of the separation. For couples with children, this process could be critical as they negotiate where their children will live and who their guardians will be. They will also need to decide whether parenting responsibilities and decisions will be shared and how time will be split between both parents to allow their children to maintain a relationship with both their mom and dad. 

How does a judge decide what's in my child's best interests?

In Oregon courts, a judge will take several factors into consideration when determining whether you or the other parent should gain custody of your child. As Oregon's 2017 Revised Statutes explain, a judge will not give preference just because of your status as father or mother. Judges focus on which parent can give children the most successful future.

Child custody and seasonal affective disorder

For any parent, a child custody dispute can be difficult for a wide variety of reasons. Not only do these disagreements often result in courtroom stress and uncertainty about one’s future relationship with his or her child, but they can even lead to depression. For some people, such as those who suffer from seasonal affective disorder, this can be particularly difficult during the winter months. If you are preparing for a custody dispute or are already in the middle of one, it may be helpful to focus on reducing the emotional impact of the issues you are working through.

When should dads get overnight visits with infants?

You want your baby's father to be involved, so joint custody may sound appealing. What may not sound appealing is letting your infant spend the night at his home--away from you. However, many psychiatrists say that it could be the best option.

Maintaining a strong parent-child relationship following divorce

Pending a divorce, many Oregon parents share similar concerns including how to help their children cope and how to reach an amicable custody agreement. Another prevalent anxiety is often centered around the ability to maintain strong parent-child relationships despite significant changes to the familial structure.

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